Archive for the 'machine learning' Category

In this episode I explain how a community detection algorithm known as Markov clustering can be constructed by combining simple concepts like random walks, graphs, similarity matrix. Moreover, I highlight how one can build a similarity graph and then run a community detection algorithm on such graph to find clusters in tabular data.

You can find a simple hands-on code snippet to play with on the Amethix Blog 

Enjoy the show! 

 

References

[1] S. Fortunato, “Community detection in graphs”, Physics Reports, volume 486, issues 3-5, pages 75-174, February 2010.

[2] Z. Yang, et al., “A Comparative Analysis of Community Detection Algorithms on Artificial Networks”, Scientific Reports volume 6, Article number: 30750 (2016)

[3] S. Dongen, “A cluster algorithm for graphs”, Technical Report, CWI (Centre for Mathematics and Computer Science) Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2000.

[4] A. J. Enright, et al., “An efficient algorithm for large-scale detection of protein families”, Nucleic Acids Research, volume 30, issue 7, pages 1575-1584, 2002.

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Training neural networks faster usually involves the usage of powerful GPUs. In this episode I explain an interesting method from a group of researchers from Google Brain, who can train neural networks faster by squeezing the hardware to their needs and making the training pipeline more dense.

Enjoy the show!

 

References

Faster Neural Network Training with Data Echoing
https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.05550

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In this episode, I am with Dr. Charles Martin from Calculation Consulting a machine learning and data science consulting company based in San Francisco. We speak about the nuts and bolts of deep neural networks and some impressive findings about the way they work. 

The questions that Charles answers in the show are essentially two:

  1. Why is regularisation in deep learning seemingly quite different than regularisation in other areas on ML?

  2. How can we dominate DNN in a theoretically principled way?

 

References 

 

 

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In this episode I have a wonderful conversation with Chris Skinner.

Chris and I recently got in touch at The banking scene 2019, fintech conference recently held in Brussels. During that conference he talked as a real trouble maker - that’s how he defines himself - saying that “People are not educated with loans, credit, money” and that “Banks are failing at digital”.

After I got my hands on his last book Digital Human, I invited him to the show to ask him a few questions about innovation, regulation and technology in finance.

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Today I am with David Kopec, author of Classic Computer Science Problems in Python, published by Manning Publications.

His book deepens your knowledge of problem solving techniques from the realm of computer science by challenging you with interesting and realistic scenarios, exercises, and of course algorithms.
There are examples in the major topics any data scientist should be familiar with, for example search, clustering, graphs, and much more.

Get the book from https://www.manning.com/books/classic-computer-science-problems-in-python and use coupon code poddatascienceathome19 to get 40% discount.

 

References

Twitter https://twitter.com/davekopec

GitHub https://github.com/davecom

classicproblems.com

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In this episode I talk about a new paradigm of learning, which can be found a bit blurry and not really different from the other methods we know of, such as supervised and unsupervised learning. The method I introduce here is called self-supervised learning.

Enjoy the show!

 

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References

Deep Clustering for Unsupervised Learning of Visual Features

Self-supervised Visual Feature Learning with Deep Neural Networks: A Survey

 

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The successes of deep learning for text analytics, also introduced in a recent post about sentiment analysis and published here are undeniable. Many other tasks in NLP have also benefitted from the superiority of deep learning methods over more traditional approaches. Such extraordinary results have also been possible due to the neural network approach to learn meaningful character and word embeddings, that is the representation space in which semantically similar objects are mapped to nearby vectors.
All this is strictly related to a field one might initially find disconnected or off-topic: biology.

 


Don't forget to subscribe to our Newsletter at amethix.com and get the latest updates in AI and machine learning. We do not spam. Promise!


 

References

[1] Rives A., et al., “Biological structure and function emerge from scaling unsupervised learning to 250 million protein sequences”, biorxiv, doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/622803

[2] Vaswani A., et al., “Attention is all you need”, Advances in neural information processing systems, pp. 5998–6008, 2017.

[3] Bahdanau D., et al., “Neural machine translation by jointly learning to align and translate”, arXiv, http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.0473.

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The rapid diffusion of social media like Facebook and Twitter, and the massive use of different types of forums like Reddit, Quora, etc., is producing an impressive amount of text data every day. 

There is one specific activity that many business owners have been contemplating over the last five years, that is identifying the social sentiment of their brand, by analysing the conversations of their users.

In this episode I explain how one can get the best shot at classifying sentences with deep learning and word embedding.

 

 

Additional material

Schematic representation of how to learn a word embedding matrix E by training a neural network that, given the previous M words, predicts the next word in a sentence. 

 

word2vec_training.png?w=702&ssl=1

 

 

Word2Vec example source code

https://gist.github.com/rlangone/ded90673f65e932fd14ae53a26e89eee#file-word2vec_example-py

 

 

References

[1] Mikolov, T. et al., "Distributed Representations of Words and Phrases and their Compositionality", Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages 3111-3119, 2013.

[2] The Best Embedding Method for Sentiment Classification, https://medium.com/@bramblexu/blog-md-34c5d082a8c5

[3] The state of sentiment analysis: word, sub-word and character embedding 
https://amethix.com/state-of-sentiment-analysis-embedding/

 

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In this episode I speak to Alexandr Honchar, data scientist and owner of blog https://medium.com/@alexrachnog
Alexandr has written very interesting posts about time series analysis for financial data. His blog is in my personal list of best tutorial blogs. 

We discuss about financial time series and machine learning, what makes predicting the price of stocks a very challenging task and why machine learning might not be enough.
As usual, I ask Alexandr how he sees machine learning in the next 10 years. His answer - in my opinion quite futuristic - makes perfect sense. 

You can contact Alexandr on

 

Enjoy the show!

 

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In this episode I have a wonderful conversation with Chris Skinner.

Chris and I recently got in touch at The banking scene 2019, fintech conference recently held in Brussels. During that conference he talked as a real trouble maker - that’s how he defines himself - saying that “People are not educated with loans, credit, money” and that “Banks are failing at digital”.

After I got my hands on his last book Digital Human, I invited him to the show to ask him a few questions about innovation, regulation and technology in finance.

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