Archive for the 'data science' Category

In this episode I have an amazing conversation with Jimmy Soni and Rob Goodman, authors of “A mind at play”, a book entirely dedicated to the life and achievements of Claude Shannon. Claude Shannon does not need any introduction. But for those who need a refresh, Shannon is the inventor of the information age

Have you heard of binary code, entropy in information theory, data compression theory (the stuff behind mp3, mpg, zip, etc.), error correcting codes (the stuff that makes your RAM work well), n-grams, block ciphers, the beta distribution, the uncertainty coefficient?

All that stuff has been invented by Claude Shannon :) 

 
Articles: 
 
Claude's papers:
 
A mind at play (book links): 

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As ML plays a more and more relevant role in many domains of everyday life, it’s quite obvious to see more and more attacks to ML systems. In this episode we talk about the most popular attacks against machine learning systems and some mitigations designed by researchers Ambra Demontis and Marco Melis, from the University of Cagliari (Italy). The guests are also the authors of SecML, an open-source Python library for the security evaluation of Machine Learning (ML) algorithms. Both Ambra and Marco are members of research group PRAlab, under the supervision of Prof. Fabio Roli.
 

SecML Contributors

Marco Melis (Ph.D Student, Project Maintainer, https://www.linkedin.com/in/melismarco/)
Ambra Demontis (Postdoc, https://pralab.diee.unica.it/it/AmbraDemontis) 
Maura Pintor (Ph.D Student, https://it.linkedin.com/in/maura-pintor)
Battista Biggio (Assistant Professor, https://pralab.diee.unica.it/it/BattistaBiggio)

References

SecML: an open-source Python library for the security evaluation of Machine Learning (ML) algorithms https://secml.gitlab.io/.

Demontis et al., “Why Do Adversarial Attacks Transfer? Explaining Transferability of Evasion and Poisoning Attacks,” presented at the 28th USENIX Security Symposium (USENIX Security 19), 2019, pp. 321–338. https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity19/presentation/demontis

W. Koh and P. Liang, “Understanding Black-box Predictions via Influence Functions,” in International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2017. https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.04730

Melis, A. Demontis, B. Biggio, G. Brown, G. Fumera, and F. Roli, “Is Deep Learning Safe for Robot Vision? Adversarial Examples Against the iCub Humanoid,” in 2017 IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision Workshops (ICCVW), 2017, pp. 751–759. https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.06939

Biggio and F. Roli, “Wild Patterns: Ten Years After the Rise of Adversarial Machine Learning,” Pattern Recognition, vol. 84, pp. 317–331, 2018. https://arxiv.org/abs/1712.03141

Biggio et al., “Evasion attacks against machine learning at test time,” in Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery in Databases (ECML PKDD), Part III, 2013, vol. 8190, pp. 387–402. https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.06131

Biggio, B. Nelson, and P. Laskov, “Poisoning attacks against support vector machines,” in 29th Int’l Conf. on Machine Learning, 2012, pp. 1807–1814. https://arxiv.org/abs/1206.6389

Dalvi, P. Domingos, Mausam, S. Sanghai, and D. Verma, “Adversarial classification,” in Tenth ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD), Seattle, 2004, pp. 99–108. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1014066

Sundararajan, Mukund, Ankur Taly, and Qiqi Yan. "Axiomatic attribution for deep networks." Proceedings of the 34th International Conference on Machine Learning-Volume 70. JMLR. org, 2017. https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.01365 

Ribeiro, Marco Tulio, Sameer Singh, and Carlos Guestrin. "Model-agnostic interpretability of machine learning." arXiv preprint arXiv:1606.05386 (2016). https://arxiv.org/abs/1606.05386

Guo, Wenbo, et al. "Lemna: Explaining deep learning based security applications." Proceedings of the 2018 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security. ACM, 2018. https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3243792

Bach, Sebastian, et al. "On pixel-wise explanations for non-linear classifier decisions by layer-wise relevance propagation." PloS one 10.7 (2015): E0130140. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0130140 

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Scaling technology and business processes are not equal. Since the beginning of the enterprise technology, scaling software has been a difficult task to get right inside large organisations. When it comes to Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, it becomes vastly more complicated. 

In this episode I propose a framework - in five pillars - for the business side of artificial intelligence.

 

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In this episode, I am with Aaron Gokaslan, computer vision researcher, AI Resident at Facebook AI Research. Aaron is the author of OpenGPT-2, a parallel NLP model to the most discussed version that OpenAI decided not to release because too accurate to be published.

We discuss about image-to-image translation, the dangers of the GPT-2 model and the future of AI.
Moreover, 
Aaron provides some very interesting links and demos that will blow your mind!

Enjoy the show! 

References

Multimodal image to image translation (not all mentioned in the podcast but recommended by Aaron)

Pix2Pix: 
 
CycleGAN:
 

GANimorph

 

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Training neural networks faster usually involves the usage of powerful GPUs. In this episode I explain an interesting method from a group of researchers from Google Brain, who can train neural networks faster by squeezing the hardware to their needs and making the training pipeline more dense.

Enjoy the show!

 

References

Faster Neural Network Training with Data Echoing
https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.05550

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In this episode I explain how a research group from the University of Lubeck dominated the curse of dimensionality for the generation of large medical images with GANs.
The problem is not as trivial as it seems. Many researchers have failed in generating large images with GANs before. One interesting application of such approach is in medicine for the generation of CT and X-ray images.
Enjoy the show!

 

References

Multi-scale GANs for Memory-efficient Generation of High Resolution Medical Images https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.01376

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In this episode I am with Jadiel de Armas, senior software engineer at Disney and author of Videflow, a Python framework that facilitates the quick development of complex video analysis applications and other series-processing based applications in a multiprocessing environment. 

I have inspected the videoflow repo on Github and some of the capabilities of this framework and I must say that it’s really interesting. Jadiel is going to tell us a lot more than what you can read from Github 

 

References

Videflow Github official repository
https://github.com/videoflow/videoflow

 

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In this episode, I am with Dr. Charles Martin from Calculation Consulting a machine learning and data science consulting company based in San Francisco. We speak about the nuts and bolts of deep neural networks and some impressive findings about the way they work. 

The questions that Charles answers in the show are essentially two:

  1. Why is regularisation in deep learning seemingly quite different than regularisation in other areas on ML?

  2. How can we dominate DNN in a theoretically principled way?

 

References 

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In this episode I explain how a community detection algorithm known as Markov clustering can be constructed by combining simple concepts like random walks, graphs, similarity matrix. Moreover, I highlight how one can build a similarity graph and then run a community detection algorithm on such graph to find clusters in tabular data.

You can find a simple hands-on code snippet to play with on the Amethix Blog 

Enjoy the show! 

 

References

[1] S. Fortunato, “Community detection in graphs”, Physics Reports, volume 486, issues 3-5, pages 75-174, February 2010.

[2] Z. Yang, et al., “A Comparative Analysis of Community Detection Algorithms on Artificial Networks”, Scientific Reports volume 6, Article number: 30750 (2016)

[3] S. Dongen, “A cluster algorithm for graphs”, Technical Report, CWI (Centre for Mathematics and Computer Science) Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2000.

[4] A. J. Enright, et al., “An efficient algorithm for large-scale detection of protein families”, Nucleic Acids Research, volume 30, issue 7, pages 1575-1584, 2002.

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Training neural networks faster usually involves the usage of powerful GPUs. In this episode I explain an interesting method from a group of researchers from Google Brain, who can train neural networks faster by squeezing the hardware to their needs and making the training pipeline more dense.

Enjoy the show!

 

References

Faster Neural Network Training with Data Echoing
https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.05550

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